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C. S. Lakin here wishing all a happy Thanksgiving. I hope you are feeling truly thankful for all the blessings God showers on us daily. We should all be thanking him daily, not just one day a year, for because of him we breath and move and have our being, as Paul says in Acts.

I thought I would share a critique checklist I put together for my soon-to-be-launched-but-nowhere-near-ready-yet new website www.CritiqueMyManuscript.com, which will be solely devoted to critique services for writers.

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Pro photo for book cover-small image-400pxHi everyone, C. S. Lakin here with some useful info on novel writing, seeing as many are participating in Nanowrimo (National Novel Writing Month). I can't think of anything I'd rather do less, since I write two novels a year and spend all the rest of my work time reading, editing, and critiquing manuscripts–mostly novels. But I know for some people it's a great discipline.

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Hi, C. S. Lakin back again to discuss further using a cinematic lens in crafting your novel. We looked at a number of camera angles that you can use in your scenes to give them a dynamic structure as well as point your reader to pay attention to the things you want her to notice. Deliberately writing your scenes using camera technique will take your writing to a more visually powerful level than ever before.

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Hi, C. S. Lakin back to discuss further how to use camera techniques in creating scenes for your novel.

We looked last time at the two types of camera angles–static and dynamic or moving. I discussed how there are numerous camera angles that are stationary, such as Close-up, Establishing Shot, and Long Shot, and these are effective and useful in sections of your scene. But I began to show you how important it is, in creating a powerful and engaging scene, to move your camera to lead your reader to notice what you want her to notice. I'm going to give you some examples of how to step back and consider ways to utilize great camera technique to create a powerful novel.

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Pro photo for book cover-small image-400px C. S. Lakin here continuing on the topic of using a cinematic lens to create visually stirring scenes.

My last two posts were basically an introduction to the concept of utilizing camera angles found in screenplays in a deliberate way in constructing a novel. I say deliberate because many of us unknowingly use camera directives instinctively. I’m sure some of that “instinct” comes from the thousands of hours we have all spent watching TV and movies throughout our lives, and these subconscious camera angles we use infiltrate our fiction writing. That can be a good thing. My hope is that by learning about different camera techniques and why they are effective, you will choose to consciously use them for a specific effect.

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