Being a Digital Missionary  by Julie Cosgrove

Digital Missions

Digital Missions

Before I began writing fiction, I became a freelance writer. My late husband’s job required us to move a lot (28 times in 35 years.) The best way I could bring in income was to click away at the keyboard. Wherever there was an internet connection, my customers could find me!

I immediately landed bids. In thanksgiving, I tithed my work day to God, writing for Him first. I came across a devotional blog site through Truth Media, Christian Women Today. I queried them in 2008, and from then on wrote two devos a months—pro bono. The leader of our writer’s critique group chided me, stating I should charge. But I felt God firmly saying, “No.”

After my husband died, I prayed for a steady income which would allow me to pursue my fiction writing. I landed a job as a church secretary. Most days, I was the only one there, available to answer the door and phones, and open rooms for various groups. It gave me plenty of time to write. The priest was fine with that. He told me, “I’d rather you write Christian fiction than play Angry Birds.” I still wrote devos for four sites, pro bono, as my ministry.

Truth Media became Power to Change. Two years later, the church laid me off. I knew God had plans for this widow who now had no income. Within two weeks, the editor in chief of The Life Project, one of the divisions of Power to Change, asked if I would consider coming on staff. As a branch of Campus Crusades, the position required me to raise my salary through partnerships. A huge leap of faith!

Now I am a writer and editor for their digital ministry. Our free articles and devos average half a million clicks a month, and encourage both Christian and secular readers to seek spiritual mentors in one of three, soon to be six, languages. Never did I imagine that what I write, and help others write, woul

Julie Costrove

Julie Cosgrove

d have such a global impact.

The world is on the internet. We help them know Jesus. Right now, donations will be matched by an anonymous donor through 2017. If God has stirred your heart to learn more about this amazing mission field, contact me at julie.cosgrove@p2c.com.

 

 

 

 

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Kathy Collard Miller

Kathy Collard Miller

Hi, I’m Kathy Collard Miller greeting you from the desert near Palm Springs in Southern California. But don’t worry, it’s a dry heat! Today let’s talk about two women in the Bible: Rebekah and Rahab.

God loves women! Not only did He create us, He features women in the Bible. He uses women for His purposes and glory. God values us and yet is honest about revealing the biblical women’s sins and mistakes.

We all have been convinced we know best for ourselves or others, yet God hasn’t gotten the memo. In the case of Rebekah, she actually received the memo from God that He would pass along the inheritance to her favored son, Jacob—not the older brother as usual. But the plan seems to be going awry so she puts in her two cents worth to the point even Jacob is worried. What does Rebekah do? Assure her son to trust her plan to manipulate God—well, not exactly in those words but that’s her intent.

What a mistake. Instead of trusting God’s sovereignty, that He is in control and can fulfill His plans, she connives …. well, let’s just call it what it is…she schemes to fulfill God’s will—her way. She just couldn’t trust God to fulfill His plan. As a result, she pays the price of never seeing her beloved son again.

In total contrast, Rahab is a woman without any previous knowledge of Jehovah God and yet depends upon His sovereignty.

Read More →

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0098_MillerHello from Kathy Collard Miller in the Southern California desert where it actually can get cold!

As I visited with my friend who complained about everything going on in her life and all she felt compelled to do, I could sense she expected me to volunteer to help. My heart went out to her but I’d really been seeking God’s will rather than responding to every need of others. It took every fiber of my trust in God to not offer to take some of the load from her, but in my heart, I knew God wasn’t calling me to this particular need.ID-100211556

Although I still succumb at times to the pressure of other’s needs, I’ve come a long way in learning to seek God first. A major help was seeing Jesus’ response to needy people. Of course, He healed the needy people clamoring for His help, but I also remind myself of a curious passage of only two verses that we could easily overlook. It’s Luke 5:15-16: “But the news about Him [Jesus] was spreading even farther, and great multitudes were gathering to hear Him and to be healed of their sicknesses. But He Himself would often slip away to the wilderness and pray.” Read More →

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Kathy Collard Miller

Kathy Collard Miller

Hello there from Kathy Collard Miller in the desert of Southern California near Palm Springs. But don’t worry, it’s a dry heat.

Talking with a women’s ministry director at a conference, I hoped she would invite me to speak at her women’s retreat. As we sat in the lounge of the convention center, I enjoyed one of the freshly baked chocolate chip cookies set before us. When she asked my opinion on some important ministry issues, I spoke with forceful and confident tones. I was thrilled to see her staring at my mouth, obviously waiting for every word I said. Surely I was impressing her with my important comments! Surely she would be compelled to invite me to speak at her women’s retreat.

After we concluded, I walked to the restroom, strolling along confidently, knowing the Lord had opened a door for future ministry. Our interaction had been mutually uplifting and my responses thoughtful and commanding. Read More →

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  Author, Dave FessendenHi, Dave Fessenden here, with some advice to Christian writers from one of my favorite children’s stories. In “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” a great ruler is hoodwinked by two charlatans who claim to have made him a set of clothes from material that is invisible to fools. The emperor cannot see the nonexistent clothes, of course, but he does not want to be considered a fool — and neither do all his subjects — so they join in the pretense that the outfit is the most beautiful they have ever seen.

Their self-deception is shattered at the royal parade, when a small child, who neither knows nor cares if he is considered a fool, laughs at the emperor appearing publicly in his underwear, and shouts, “The emperor has no clothes!” Read More →

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