Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Kathy Collard Miller

Kathy Collard Miller

Hi, I’m Kathy Collard Miller greeting you from the desert near Palm Springs in Southern California. But don’t worry, it’s a dry heat! Today let’s talk about two women in the Bible: Rebekah and Rahab.

God loves women! Not only did He create us, He features women in the Bible. He uses women for His purposes and glory. God values us and yet is honest about revealing the biblical women’s sins and mistakes.

We all have been convinced we know best for ourselves or others, yet God hasn’t gotten the memo. In the case of Rebekah, she actually received the memo from God that He would pass along the inheritance to her favored son, Jacob—not the older brother as usual. But the plan seems to be going awry so she puts in her two cents worth to the point even Jacob is worried. What does Rebekah do? Assure her son to trust her plan to manipulate God—well, not exactly in those words but that’s her intent.

What a mistake. Instead of trusting God’s sovereignty, that He is in control and can fulfill His plans, she connives …. well, let’s just call it what it is…she schemes to fulfill God’s will—her way. She just couldn’t trust God to fulfill His plan. As a result, she pays the price of never seeing her beloved son again.

In total contrast, Rahab is a woman without any previous knowledge of Jehovah God and yet depends upon His sovereignty.

Read More →

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutube
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

0098_MillerHello from Kathy Collard Miller in the Southern California desert where it actually can get cold!

As I visited with my friend who complained about everything going on in her life and all she felt compelled to do, I could sense she expected me to volunteer to help. My heart went out to her but I’d really been seeking God’s will rather than responding to every need of others. It took every fiber of my trust in God to not offer to take some of the load from her, but in my heart, I knew God wasn’t calling me to this particular need.ID-100211556

Although I still succumb at times to the pressure of other’s needs, I’ve come a long way in learning to seek God first. A major help was seeing Jesus’ response to needy people. Of course, He healed the needy people clamoring for His help, but I also remind myself of a curious passage of only two verses that we could easily overlook. It’s Luke 5:15-16: “But the news about Him [Jesus] was spreading even farther, and great multitudes were gathering to hear Him and to be healed of their sicknesses. But He Himself would often slip away to the wilderness and pray.” Read More →

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutube
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Kathy Collard Miller

Kathy Collard Miller

Hello there from Kathy Collard Miller in the desert of Southern California near Palm Springs. But don’t worry, it’s a dry heat.

Talking with a women’s ministry director at a conference, I hoped she would invite me to speak at her women’s retreat. As we sat in the lounge of the convention center, I enjoyed one of the freshly baked chocolate chip cookies set before us. When she asked my opinion on some important ministry issues, I spoke with forceful and confident tones. I was thrilled to see her staring at my mouth, obviously waiting for every word I said. Surely I was impressing her with my important comments! Surely she would be compelled to invite me to speak at her women’s retreat.

After we concluded, I walked to the restroom, strolling along confidently, knowing the Lord had opened a door for future ministry. Our interaction had been mutually uplifting and my responses thoughtful and commanding. Read More →

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutube
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

  Author, Dave FessendenHi, Dave Fessenden here, with some advice to Christian writers from one of my favorite children’s stories. In “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” a great ruler is hoodwinked by two charlatans who claim to have made him a set of clothes from material that is invisible to fools. The emperor cannot see the nonexistent clothes, of course, but he does not want to be considered a fool — and neither do all his subjects — so they join in the pretense that the outfit is the most beautiful they have ever seen.

Their self-deception is shattered at the royal parade, when a small child, who neither knows nor cares if he is considered a fool, laughs at the emperor appearing publicly in his underwear, and shouts, “The emperor has no clothes!” Read More →

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutube
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Heather and babyThis photo overwhelmed me when I first saw it more than a year ago. I felt as if I were looking into the soul of the women in the novel I'd just finished writing–When the Morning Glory Blooms.

I couldn't stop staring at it. I knew the real story behind it. A friend of mine held her sweet baby boy, happy to be a mother again. Looking forward to getting back into running and to finishing nursing school.

But my imagination set that aside to picture my characters and their longings, their disappointments, the depth of their pain, some of it related to the children they held and the secrets they suppressed.

Their futures–that bleached light beyond the window in the picture–were filled with uncertainty and more longing.

They, like me, were overwhelmed…but for far different reasons.

A writer's heart is often overwhelmed. He or she dives deep into characters' emotional upheavals, experiencing them in a way, in order to write about them authentically. 

Read More →

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinrssyoutube