Author, Jeanette Hanscome

Hello from Jeanette. Today I spent 20 minutes in the backseat of our car with a trembling 50-lb dog. Car rides turn our pit mix, Belle, into a spineless mutt. They trigger memories of shots and other unpleasant vet visits. I assured Belle that we were only going to PetSmart to get her nails trimmed but she continued to squeal and pace, starring helplessly out the window, silently pleading to passersby, “Help me! I’m on my way to the manicurist. It’s so scary there.” I teased Belle about being a big baby, reminded her of her bread, but nothing worked. We dragged her into PetSmart, handed her over to the torturers  . . . I mean the guy with the clippers, and waited for the wails. Of course we heard none. Like a two-year-old who only cries long enough to make Mom feel guilty for leaving her in the church nursery, she was fine as soon as we walked away with our receipt. We returned in ten minutes to a relaxed dog. The clipping was over. And it wasn’t so bad. In fact, judging from the look on her face, it felt good to have those claws out of the way. All that whimpering for nothing.

So what does this have to do with writing, speaking, and book promotion? A lot, actually.

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Bonnie Leon

Bonnie Leon

It’s a new year and a lot of us have made New Year’s resolutions or simply decided that “this year will be different”. However, let’s not leap into change willy-nilly. If we leap too quickly it may lead to defeat, or what we see as defeat. Writers already experience enough of that.

 

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Kern_web shot Jan here, writing about nonfiction writing craft on this fine Friday in January of the new decade.

Let’s talk about the craft of storytelling in nonfiction. Fiction writers naturally spend much focused time developing the craft of story. Nonfiction writers quickly discover this is essential for their writing as well.

It is very possible that a section of story excerpted from its larger context could be told so well that a hearer or reader would need to guess if it’s nonfiction or fiction. Is it a true account told by a storyteller who has skillfully woven the facts through a creative use of fiction techniques? Or is it fiction written with such factual, researched detail that it seems real?

For this post, we’ll look specifically at the story crafted as nonfiction. What are some of the ways we can build stronger storytelling technique into our nonfiction—whether essay, article, or book?

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Tracy (T.L.) Higley here, posting another marketing lesson I’ve learned from my years in online retail sales. As I’ve mentioned in previous months, I’m currently in the midst of an experimental year, applying principles from my retail business to the marketing of my fiction.

So, on to Principle #5…  People will act if you make them a good offer.So, on to Principle #5…  People will act if you make them a good offer.


For the past six years, as I’ve run a For the past six years, as I’ve run a retail internet businessretail internet business and experimented with various kinds of marketing, the one thing that has consistently been true is this – if the offer is good, interested people will take action. 


You already have interested people – on your website, on your mailing list, reading your newsletter. If you craft an offer that is good, these people will take the action you’re looking for. 


Perhaps you’d like a newsletter subscriber to purchase one or more of your books, or perhaps the desired action is to have a website visitor sign up for your newsletter. Tie these actions to incentives that are desirable, and people will act.

What incentives? you ask.



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1020_0807e Hey, friends!

It’s time to usher in a brand new year. Now, I know you’re expecting me to jump into a nice little story about making a new resolution to help you become the person you’ve always wanted to be. Sorry, not happening.

Instead, I want you to take a minute to celebrate who God created you to be — who He saw before you were created in your mother’s womb. The potential He sees today, in the midst of your failures, trials, and shortcomings. Search for what God sees in you, underneath all the influences of this world.

That’s who you really are, and who God is using to share His story of hope, grace and love.

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