Sarah Sundin

Sarah Sundin

Greetings from Sarah Sundin! Today I have the joy of interviewing one of CAN’s newest members, Michelle Medlock Adams. Michelle has written over eighty books for children and for adults. With her award-winning background in journalism, she’s written many biographies for celebrities as well. I think you’ll enjoy what she has to share!

Welcome, Michelle! Please tell us about your new book, Platinum Faith.

Michelle Medlock Adams

Michelle Medlock Adams

Platinum exemplifies some of the most rare, useful qualities of all metals. In Platinum Faith, we highlight twelve platinum properties and how they relate to our walk of faith. More specifically, we delve into how they parallel our divine calling, our eternal value, and the unlimited love God has for us. Read More →

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I hate conflict. I hate getting into disagreements with my husband. I don’t like having a spat with a friend. As a parent, I hated the constant conflict resolution that was needed when my two kids didn’t get along.

As a teacher, I sure didn’t enjoy being the one who had to break up the many tiffs between pubescent girls. And as a Grandma? Well, let’s just say that conflict’s not in the grandma cards.

So when I began writing fiction, I knew that conflict is a main ingredient to a good story. To write good, compelling fiction, I had to have compelling conflict that would hold the reader’s attention. But how was I going to address the very thing that tempted me to run? I had to settle that question—and quick!

Although conflict is often present in almost every day of our lives, we may overlook or ignore it. When confronted with conflict, I tend to self-talk, fret, stew, worry, and struggle with sleepless nights. But those ways of dealing with conflict won’t make a good story.

Conflict is uncomfortable, and most conflict just plain hurts. But that’s what keeps readers reading. Like you and me, readers want to know how others deal with conflict, how characters try and fail and try again and finally succeed.

Because it’s hard for me to invent conflict when I want to avoid it, I had to be aware of this weakness. So when doing rewrites and editing, I often have to add an element of conflict or deepen it.

In Sara’s Surprise, there’s a lot of conflict going on—conflict I drew on from personal experience.

Have you ever been harassed by an employer? I have, and it’s pretty traumatizing. In this “Me Too” movement, lots of women are speaking up about their trials and tribulations in the workplace, so I decided to explore the topic.

In Sara’s Surprise, Sara struggles to work as a pastry chef, navigating abuse and harassment by her volatile French boss, as was all-too common in 1873. Women had no recourse and often feared they’d be blamed and dismissed from their jobs, so they kept silent. Back then, women were often devalued and unappreciated, under-paid and treated poorly. And men took advantage of the cultural norms of the day.

As a single mom in the early 1990s, I was treated poorly, too. And I regret that I was afraid to speak up and expose the nasty man who threatened, teased, and tormented me. As a leader in the organization, that should never have occurred, but it did. Thankfully, today’s climate is more open to reporting such abuse.

Sara’s Surprise explores this problem from several angles. But in the midst of Sara’s trials, she falls in love and learns a lot about the art of baking French pastries. And the lovely Christmas surprise will delight you this holiday season. I hope you’ll pick up a copy and enjoy the story.

Susan G. Mathis is a multi-published author of stories set in the beautiful Thousand Islands, her childhood stomping ground in upstate NY. Katelyn’s Choice, the first in The Thousand Islands Gilded Age series, is available now, and book two, Devyn’s Dilemma, releases in April, 2020. The Fabric of Hope: An Irish Family LegacyChristmas Charity, and Sara’s Surprise are available now. Visit www.SusanGMathis.com for more.

 

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Rebecca Ondov Back Cover Photo
Davalynn Spencer

Davalynn Spencer

Davalynn Spencer here, wondering how November showed up so soon. I don’t think I’m ready, but author Rebecca Ondov is with her featured book today, Great Horse Stories for Girls.

Welcome, Rebecca, give us the back-cover copy for this book that I would have loved to read growing up. (Okay, still would.)

Girls love horses! Horsewoman Rebecca Ondov invites tweens (ages 8 to 12) to enjoy these true horse stories that will help them build confidence in God’s love, make wiser choices, and create stronger friendships, as well as encounter life-changing truths that will help them grow strong spiritually, emotionally, and mentally.

Rebecca Ondov Back Cover Photo

Rebecca Ondov

Wow – what a great introduction. What inspired you to write this book?

My heart aches for the generation of children that are being raised today. So often, through the media and culture, kids get the impression that they have no value. When in reality they are a one-of-a-kind treasure created by God Himself. My goal with this book is to help them see themselves as a priceless gift from God. Read More →

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True Heart Girls Devotional: Thinking God’s Way

by Sherry Kyle

Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Publisher: RoseKidz, November 1, 2019

ISBN-13: 978-1628627848

About the book:

Discover true joy and peace as you focus your thoughts on God’s promises! This devotional for girls ages 8-12 will help girls learn to fix their thoughts on what the Bible says is important, such as what is true, honorable, right, pure, lovely, admirable, excellent, and worthy of praise among other things!

Packed with 13 weeks of devotions, relatable stories, Scriptures, and over 40 fun activities & crafts, the True Heart Girls Devotional: Thinking God’s Way helps tween girls apply wisdom from Philippians 4:4-9 to their daily lives.

About the Author:

Sherry Kyle is an award-winning author of books for tween girls, including ECPA Christian Book Award finalist, True Heart Girls Devotional: God’s Promises for Me. She also writes novels for women set along the coast of California where she makes her home with her college sweetheart and their four children. When she’s not writing, Sherry spends her time reading, having coffee with friends, and decorating her beach home. You can visit her at www.sherrykyle.com, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

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Negative attitudes have a way of creeping up on all of us at times. Good advice for turning them around is keeping a gratitude journal—a list of the things you’re thankful for each day.

When we put our focus on the positive aspects of our lives, the impact of the negatives begins to shrink.

Psalm 100 can be viewed as a prescription for keeping a gratitude journal about God—for learning to thank Him and praise Him for who He is and what He does.

Coming before God to worship with thanksgiving and praise is easy when we’re keenly aware of His nature.

“Enter his gates with thanksgiving and his courts with praise; give thanks to him and praise his name” (Psalm 100:4 NIV).

Some of the things the book of Psalms encourages us to thank God for are:

  • His creation
  • His provision and care
  • His compassion
  • His salvation
  • His guidance
  • His power

What else can you add to this list?

God is good, and He is good to us. Why not start your own gratitude journal about God today? Use it often to help you praise and worship Him. He is worthy.

Diane Stortz is a multi-published author whose goal is making God’s wonders known to the next generation. This devotion is adapted from her new book, Encountering God’s Heart for You: 365 Devotions from Genesis Through Revelation (Bethany House).

 

 

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