Dianne Neal Matthews

Dianne Neal Matthews


Happy 1st Monday (of the month which ushers in spring, I might add!) from Dianne Neal Matthews. Last month I loved Jeanette’s post about sharing in the joys of fellow writers’ successes. It reminded me of a lesson that God taught me several years ago, when I was at one of the lowest points of my life.

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Happy Monday to you from Bonnie Leon.

Bonnie's photos July 2007 025 -- 02  

 

In all my yeas of writing I've seen very little resentment, back-biting, or mistrust among my writing friends and acquaintances. However, knowing the human condition (we're very self-centered) I understand that all of these emotions, and more, are present in the writing world. And I know my own heart, which is not always pure.

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SusieChairGreetings, Dear Friends!

Susie Larson here!

I post on the last Thursday of each month about the topic of building a speaking platform. Today I want to explore the idea of when it is okay to share about a personal heartache or trial, and when it is better to hold it for a while.

While I do believe that sometimes God calls us to step up and share a vulnerable story (while we are right in the midst of it all), most of the time wisdom calls us to give it time, to get on the other side of it, and to wipe the dirt off of the spoils from our war.

The thing is, certain types of pain produce amazing testimonies right in the midst of the pain, while other types of heartache require a time of healing and understanding.

For instance, I have heard of parents who have lost a child and who stood up and spoke about their loss with power and conviction only days after their tragedy. And, after hearing their testimony, many came to Christ. Absolutely amazing.

But when it comes to divorce, betrayal, or any kind of relational break down, those messages need time for healing, understanding, and even wisdom about what is best to share, and what is best to hold. Furthermore, when our stories involve other people, we need to be respectful of their story.

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Author, Jeanette Hanscome

Hello from Jeanette. Today I spent 20 minutes in the backseat of our car with a trembling 50-lb dog. Car rides turn our pit mix, Belle, into a spineless mutt. They trigger memories of shots and other unpleasant vet visits. I assured Belle that we were only going to PetSmart to get her nails trimmed but she continued to squeal and pace, starring helplessly out the window, silently pleading to passersby, “Help me! I’m on my way to the manicurist. It’s so scary there.” I teased Belle about being a big baby, reminded her of her bread, but nothing worked. We dragged her into PetSmart, handed her over to the torturers  . . . I mean the guy with the clippers, and waited for the wails. Of course we heard none. Like a two-year-old who only cries long enough to make Mom feel guilty for leaving her in the church nursery, she was fine as soon as we walked away with our receipt. We returned in ten minutes to a relaxed dog. The clipping was over. And it wasn’t so bad. In fact, judging from the look on her face, it felt good to have those claws out of the way. All that whimpering for nothing.

So what does this have to do with writing, speaking, and book promotion? A lot, actually.

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Bonnie Leon

Bonnie Leon

It’s a new year and a lot of us have made New Year’s resolutions or simply decided that “this year will be different”. However, let’s not leap into change willy-nilly. If we leap too quickly it may lead to defeat, or what we see as defeat. Writers already experience enough of that.

 

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