JanetPerezEckles-Use

Don’t you hate long, silly greetings on voice mail? I do. I want quickly to get to the beep so I can leave a message.

But I was surprised when I called a new friend and heard her beautiful greeting. “I love that sweet greeting,” I said when she returned my call. “It sounds so very positive and upbeat. Not like most that are the same as everyone else. I love how your personality comes through.”

“Who is this?” the person said.

Gulp. I had dialed the wrong number. Lesson learned: listen, listen, really listen—before speaking!

And you know what? Being the smart chica that I try to be, I decided that I’d carry that lesson when I read God’s Word. As I often do, I ring God for a private conversation. I dial the Bible verse. Then check to see if it’s the one I need to hear. And to my surprise, it seldom is.

And because I learned to listen, it often happens that particular verse is one I desperately need to learn. It’s the one God meant for me to hear. It’s the specific one that would change me, change my attitude and even change my circumstance.

How about you? Have you been listening to God lately? I mean really listening? If you have, your heart will sing: “You have made known to me the path of life; you will fill me with joy in your presence, with eternal pleasures at your right hand…How sweet are Your words to my taste, sweeter than honey to my mouth!” (Psalm 16:11, 119: 103).

Father, when I taste the bitterness of life, I shall learn to listen to you, to your voice, your guidance and promise so my life turns sweet with reassurance and joy. In Jesus’ name, amen.

• What voice are you listening to?

• What keeps you from listening to His whisper?

• What change have you seen when His voice speaks louder than the world?

Janet

Judson Press, 2011

Simply Salsa, Amazon Best-selling book

 

 

Blindness tried to darken her life. Tragedy tried to defeat her. But instead, Janet Perez Eckles became an international speaker, #1 best-selling author, radio host and personal success coach. Her passion is to help you see the best of life by conquering fear and showing you the secret to personal success. www.janetperezeckles.com

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Bigger smile - close up 4th of July 2012

Hi from Gail Gaymer Martin at www.gailmartin.com

I look forward to dropping by to share a new post with you about writing Christian fiction. I’ve been blessed for the past twelve years with an amazing career – second career actually, and I’ve learned so much on this journey.

One thing to know is that learning never ends. I read magazines and books on writing, continual improving my craft and loving every moment.

I’ve been sharing thoughts on Intimate Storytelling which means bring the main characters to life in a dynamic way that they seem real. Today I will show you how you can reveal characterization in a rather different way.

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Pic for website 2012     Hello, again! Maureen Pratt here with my monthly blogpost about the craft of writing. Today, I'm going to focus on techniques to employ to find and write distinctive voices for each of your characters or individuals in fiction or non-fiction.

    I began my professional writing career as a playwright, earning my Master of Fine Arts in Theater Arts with a concentration in playwriting from UCLA and later having a number of plays produced. Unlike writing for the movies, playwriting "runs" on dialogue. A professional script for live theater contains very little, if any, description except to set the scene, and actor's notes should be non-existent. (Once a play has been published, which assumes it's been produced, these notes are usually inserted as guidelines for subsequent productions, however, original scripts do not include them.) So, it's vital that a playwright master the art of dialogue, crafting lines that contain meaning, emphasis, and character without "indicating" these in the script.

Example: "Mary: He did what? How? I don't believe it" instead of: "Mary (raising her voice and her eyebrows): He did what? (She sits down on the sofa) How? (She sighs) I don't believe it."

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