Hi! Sherry Kyle here, writing from my laptop in central California.

Sherry Kyle headshotBy definition, setting is the period and place of a story. It gives a story authenticity and gives the characters and plot believability. In other words, your setting is the large frame, which defines the surrounding for your characters.

When I wrote my first published novel, it didn’t take long to decide where I wanted my story to take place. I lived near a charming coastal town that would, in my opinion, be a wonderful backdrop for the contemporary fiction world I wanted to create.

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Golden

Love Finds You In Golden New Mexico, by Lena Nelson Dooley

Lena Nelson Dooley's historical romance, Love Finds You in Golden, New Mexico is ALL about love. Anyone who has studied the five different types of love–attraction (epithumia), romance (eros), affection (storge), friendship (phile), and selfless giving (agape)–will recognize examples of every facet of love in the characters Dooley created for her story. Surrounded by a vivid setting in the 1890s mining town, Madeline Mercer and Jeremiah Dennison interact with kind, lovable God-fearing friends, as well as selfish, conniving criminals, before finding one another. You'll find yourself turning pages far more swiftly than you might expect while reading a book set in this time and place. If you enjoy inspirational, historical, romantic fiction, you'll want to pick this one up.

This book review was uploaded by Cecelia Dowdy. Happy reading!

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DonnBusPhotos-007a2x3                        by

                  Donn Taylor

    In my last poetry blog we talked about finding strong words and putting them in emphatic positions in the poetic line. The end of the line is most emphatic; the beginning, next-most emphatic. Now we go on to specific kinds of strong words.
    As Lawrence Perrine wrote, poetry speaks in "higher voltage" than prose. One essential means of achieving that higher voltage is the effective use of images—words or phrases that appeal to one of the five senses. Why important? Because everything we know about the world we live in comes to us through one or more of the five senses. When we appeal to these senses in writing, we imitate the learning method our readers have used all their lives. Images are not only attractive in their own right: they are essential to gaining reader interest.

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Good day to you from Sarah Sundin!

CAN Windle

Today I have the honor of interviewing award-winning author, Jeanette Windle. Her most recent novel, Freedom’s Stand, was nominated for the Golden Scroll Novel of the Year, and her novel Veiled Freedom was a finalist for the Christian Book Award and the Christy in 2010.

 

CAN Windle Freedom's Stand

SS: Jeanette, how did you get into writing?

JW: Writing has always been such a part of my life, I can’t remember ever consciously wanting to write. The missionary kid boarding school I attended in the Venezuelan Andes put great emphasis on proper composition (we were doing term papers with footnotes in junior high), and we spent far too much time writing to ever daydream about it. I was newspaper editor and yearbook copy editor in high school. In college I did some short stories, then as a young missionary, my writing was mainly prayer letters and ministry material.

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Trail

Long Trail Home, book 3 in the Texas Trails: A Morgan Family series
by Vickie McDonough
Moody Publishers
ISBN 978-0802405852

A weary soldier returns from the War Between the States to discover his parents dead, his family farm in shambles, and his fiancée married. Riley Morgan takes a job at the Wilcox School for Blind Children and tries to make peace with God and himself. When a pretty, blind woman who cares for the children reaches through his scarred walls and touches his heart, he begins to find renewed faith and hope for the future. But when he discovers Annie feigned her blindness just to have a home, will his anger and hurt drive him away and ruin all chances for a future filled with love, faith, and family?

Bio:
Vickie McDonough is an award-winning author of 24 books and novellas. Her books have won the Inspirational Reader’s Choice Contest, Texas Gold, the ACFW Noble Theme contest, and she has been a multi-year finalist in ACFW’s BOTY/Carol Awards. She was voted Third Favorite Author in the Heartsong Presents Annual Readers Contest in 2009. Vickie is the author of the fun and feisty Texas Boardinghouse Brides series from Barbour Publishing. Watch for her new books from Moody Publishers, Texas Trails: A Morgan Family series, in which she partners with Susan Page Davis and Darlene Franklin to write a 6-book series that spans 50 years of the Morgan family. The first three books release this fall. Also, next year brings the release of another new series from Guidepost/Summerside, Pioneer Promises, set in 1870s Kansas.
Endorsements:


Hold on to your heart—Vickie McDonough is about to steal it away with an irresistible love story so unique and fresh, it will leave you breathless. It may be a “long trail home,” but the pages have never flown so fast! This is prairie romance at its very best—I loved it!
Julie Lessman, award-winning author of The Daughters of Boston and Winds of Change series
McDonough fans rejoice!  Vickie’s given you another winner, this timing bringing post-Civil War Texas to life in a memorable story of loss and love, of regret and redemption.  You won’t want to miss this poignant tale of two wounded souls searching for the true meaning of home.
Amanda Cabot, author of Tomorrow’s Garden

Happy reading!

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