Sundin #D70 ©2008 Linda Johnson Photography web (2)Greetings from Sarah Sundin in California! Today I have the privilege of interviewing historical fiction author Roseanna White. I’ve enjoyed getting to know her on line, and love her skill with words and her sense of humor.


CAN Roseanna WhiteRoseanna, how did you get into writing?

I’ve been writing since I learned how to put pencil to paper in primary school. It was a day when I was out sick with an ear infection that I realized I could entertain myself by scratching a story about a princess with a magical hair bow on some scrap paper–and there’s been no stopping me since!

A magical hair bow–I want one of those. How many books do you have published?

I now have four books available and another five contracted. My most recent are Love Finds You in Annapolis, Maryland, set in 1783, and the just-released Revolutionary War spy romance, Ring of Secrets.


CAN R White bookHow did you get your first book contract?

My first books were small press. WhiteFire Publishing is actually owned by my hubby, so we launched with my biblical novels to keep from experimenting on anyone else. Those titles have both done very well, but I kept pursuing contracts with the bigger houses as I worked for WhiteFire. Both my contract with Summerside and my series with Harvest House were the result of making a connection with the editors. Both actually rejected the first manuscripts they took to committee (both contemporaries), but liked my writing and asked to see other projects. The Lord definitely had His hand in that, leading me back to my first love–historical romance–in both cases.

Read More →

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube

Pam-Fave 7 closeupHello! Pamela S. Meyers here with another article on book promotion. My theme for these monthly articles started out with a focus on marketing your debut novel. That was over a year ago. I now have two more books coming out in the next couple of months so my view has shifted.

Love Will Find a Way is releasing within the next couple of weeks, then fast on the heels of that book,  Love Finds You in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin releases on April 1, 2013. A couple short years ago if I’d been told I’d have one book already published and two more due out within a month of each other, I’d have said “no way.” God is full of surprises!

With my LFY book, I’m embarking into new marketing waters as the book is with a large publisher who is able to provide valuable assistance in marketing my novel. Does that mean that I can sit back and let my publisher promote my book? Not at all. I’m fast learning that I am part of a marketing team.

The setting for my story is a popular getaway spot and the downtown area is filled with nice gift shops, but no large bookstore. That’s where we’ve become creative. Over the April 27th and 28th weekend, I’m first doing a launch presentation and signing at the Geneva Lake Museum—an
Glm_logo_large appropriate venue since my book is historical romance—and the next day, I’m signing my book at the Cornerstone Gift Shop and Gallery, a very nice gift store that sits at the main intersection of town.The same intersection that is mentioned in the first chapter of my book.

The museum event will be more involved with a Power Point presentation where I plan to share anecdotes about my childhood growing up in the town and later doing research for my story. That will be followed by a question and answer session and a book signing.

During the event at the gift shop, I will not be doing a formal presentation, but positioned at a table where I can have conversations with theIMG_0286-sq-sm guests as I’m signing their books.

The point is that you don’t always have to have events and signings in a bookstore or a library. Go where the people are and try to utilize the setting or timeframe when selecting a venue.

Both of these events are new territory for me and I’m very excited. I’ll probably be doing a report in my May blog of what worked and didn’t work, so stay tuned!

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube

Mind Of Her Own by Diana Lesire Brandmeyer

Who knew making dinner could
change your life? Louisa Copeland certainly didn’t. But when the George Foreman
grill fell out of the pantry onto her head, resulting in a bump and a mighty
case of amnesia, Louisa’s life takes a turn for the unexpected. Who was this
Collin fellow, claiming she was his wife? And whose kids are those? Her name
couldn’t be Louisa. Why, she was the renowned romance writer Jazz Sweet, not a
Midwestern mom of three. Struggling to put the pieces together of the life
she’s told she had, Louisa/Jazz may realize that some memories are better left
alone.

Mind Of Her Own can be purchase from Amazon, Barnes And Noble, and Christianbook.com

 

Christian author, Diana Lesire Brandmeyer, writes historical
and contemporary romances. Author of Mind of Her Own, A Bride's Dilemma in
Friendship, Tennessee and We’re Not
Blended-We’re Pureed, A Survivor’s Guide to Blended Families
. Once widowed
and now remarried she writes with humor and experience on the difficulty of
joining two families be it fictional or real life.

Visit her website:http://www.dianabrandmeyer.com

This new release information was uploaded by Cecelia Dowdy! Happy writing!

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube

Maureen Pratt Author PicHello! Maureen Pratt here with my monthly CAN blog. This time, some thoughts on writing the devotional.

The devotional is intensely personal, but can also provide tremendous support for many. I've experienced this first-hand. When I was first diagnosed with lupus, I suffered from a number of life-threatening symptoms. None, however, was as confounding as the non-life-threatening phenomenon of lupus brain fog, which is much like looking at the world through a pea-soup fog on a chilly day. It isn't permanent, much like those clouds of fog, and it doesn't cause changes in the brain, per se. But it does make memories slippery at times, and frustration quick to rise.

Faced with a horrible diagnosis, I turned to prayer, Scripture, and reflective meditation on what I had read and prayed about. Only, I would forget what I had read and prayed about. Frequently. I finally bought a spiral-bound notebook and started writing down what I read and prayed about. A year later, I looked back at the now-full notebook and wondered, "Could someone else benefit from what's in here?" Then, I prayed. And then, I called my agent. A few years later, my book "Peace in the Storm: Meditations on Chronic Pain & Illness" was published and has been reaching readers like myself, patients of chronic pain & illness, ever since. Such a blessing!

Writing the devotional is a highly personal pursuit, fueled by insight and inspiration born from experience. Not all experience needs to be that of the writer, but ideally each devotion should be linked to a "ripped from real life" instance in someone's life. I liken writing a devotional to being a "spiritual reporter," combining life's events with the place God takes within it all.

As they are extensions of our faith, devotionals spring from Scriptural reflections. Reading Scripture regularly and listening to the passages resonate gives the right context for the meditations you craft for each topic. I also spent much time in an empty church, sitting quietly, reading passages, then sitting quietly again. The waters of the Word can refresh us whenever we partake of them, but they truly nourish us when we let them soak into us completely.

Devotional structure will be unique to each project, but ideally each project does have a structure, an arc, a way in which it builds and carries the reader through to greater insight, comfort, or encouragement. At the same time, devotionals are often read in pieces, and not linearly, so the author needs to keep this in mind (avoid referring to a previous devotion, for example).

Writing "Peace in the Storm…" was exhausting for me, but what motivated me to keep going was the thought of my audience. Each day, I prayed for and thought of someone who would read what I was writing, someone who was suffering with or from the particular problem, or asking the particular question, that I addressed in the devotion I wrote that day. Keeping the reader close to mind and heart enables the words to flow as from a friend to a friend, a very effective and empathetic voice.

Blessings to you!

Maureen

www.maureenpratt.com

http://blog.beliefnet.com/gooddaysbaddays/

 

 

 

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube

DC_SpencerToday I’m happy to introduce author Kathy Howard as she shares highlights from her amazing writing journey. You’ll be encouraged by her discoveries and innovative suggestions. Thanks for reading!                                              ~Davalynn Spencer

 

Kathy, tell us how you first became involved in writing.

My passion for teaching the Bible led me to writing. About 10 years ago, God dropped me into the middle of a teaching ministry to spiritual seekers. After using the material I had for a while, I knew I could develop curriculum that would better meet that group’s specific needs. I was in seminary at the time so writing the Bible study, God’s Truth Revealed, became my field study work. This study opened the door for two more studies, a devotional book, and a non-fiction title.

Read More →

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube