Simply salsaSimply Salsa

“Picture yourself seated in a comfortable chair. A luscious Latin melody dances in the background as you spend a few hours with a dear friend. Her smile embraces you like a warm hug. Her openness encourages you to share your heart. And her words of wisdom challenge you to follow the God of boundless love.

This golden afternoon mirrors the experience of reading Janet Perez Eckles’ Simply Salsa: Dancing Without Fear at God’s Fiesta. The book takes a refreshing look at the Christ-life—with a unique Latina flair. Authenticity drives this project, whose author shares her wisdom through real-life stories with a sprinkling of Spanish (translations provided).

The choices and challenges Eckles has faced include everything from life in a new land and language at the vulnerable age of twelve to the crushing loss of an adult son to the heartbreaking news of her own impending blindness.

Reader-focused questions and challenges enhance the book’s conversational feel. The author’s gentle humor and transparency allow readers to learn and laugh without finger-pointing or lectures.

Reader-focused questions and challenges enhance the book’s conversational feel. 

 

As one recent reader said, ‘Janet may be blind, but something tells me she sees more than most of us’.”

M Marti Pieper, Book Doctor/Writer/Editor

This book review was uploaded by Cecelia Dowdy. Happy reading!

 

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Rogers,AmeliasJourneyFIN(1)Amelia’s Journey by Martha Rogers

For Ben Haynes it is love at first sight, but can a Boston socialite find true happiness with a cowboy from Kansas?

Once childhood friends, Ben Haynes is taken with Amelia Carlyle when he runs into her at her sister’s wedding. Although he will be returning to Kansas and life on his father’s ranch, Ben calls on Amelia several times, and they find they have more in common than they first realized. As he leaves for Kansas, they promise to write.

Back in Kansas, Ben begins to save money toward a home for Amelia even though he has not made his intentions known. He’s relying on God to make a way. Meanwhile, Amelia is presented to society and has several young men vying for her attention.

Although Ben has captured Amelia’s heart, her parents make every effort to discourage the relationship, even forbidding Amelia to correspond with him. Amelia tells Ben that she will wait for him as long as it takes, but will the love and loss they experience along the way bring them closer or drive them apart forever?

 

Bio

Martha Rogers is the author of Becoming Lucy; Morning for Dove; Finding Becky; Caroline’s Choice; Not on the Menu, a part of a novella collection with DiAnn Mills, Janice Thompson, and Kathleen Y’Barbo; and River Walk Christmas, a novella collection with Beth Goddard, Lynette Sowell, and Kathleen Y’Barbo. The Her new series, Seasons of the Heart includes Summer Dream and Autumn Song. A former schoolteacher and English instructor, she has a master’s degree in education and lives with her husband in Houston, Texas.

This new release information was uploaded by Cecelia Dowdy. Happy reading!

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Sherry Kyle headshotHi from the central coast of California. This is Sherry Kyle with a word of encouragment for you.

Psalm 28:7

“The Lord is my strength and my shield; my heart trusts in him, and I am helped.  My heart leaps for joy and I will give thanks to him in song.”

 

I love this verse.  It reminds me of the chorus to the children’s song:

“The joy of the Lord is my strength.” 

 

Do you remember singing that song in Sunday School when you were a child?  For those of you who didn’t grow up in a Christian home, those eight words are repeated four times in a simple melody.  Simple words with great impact! 

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Aloha from Karen,

Karen7.8.2011At my first writer’s conference I won the persistence award. I wondered if I just asked the most questions and if that was a polite way to say I was a pest. But over time I realize writers need persistence to succeed and someone saw that in me.

I looked at this year’s calendar and already see deadlines looming and contracts that look great-more than I ever expected. I look back and realize I persisted and years of hard work matter. Even more, I see other writers I knew from my early beginnings also finding more success over the years as they persist. I watched writers who wrote more eloquently and faster fall away because they gave up too soon or felt overwhelmed by rejection slips.

Whatever point you are at in writing, be persistent. Continue in spite of the many obstacles and rejections along the way. And work to be consistent in writing and professionalism.

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DonnBusPhotos-007a2x3      Hello. I'm Donn Taylor, here again to talk more about poetry writing and ways to achieve the "higher voltage" that distinguishes poetry from most prose. We've talked about putting strong words in emphatic places, use of images, and a little bit about figurative language. Reserving that last for further treatment later, today we'll begin looking at ways to organize a poem. Those ways are infinite, or course, so we'll confine ourselves to some of the most common. Today, only one.

      First, some generalizations: In narrative poetry, the structure of the story becomes the structure of the poem. That leaves us lyric poetry: that is, poetry that expresses the poet's thoughts or emotions. (We hope those will be significant enough to interest the reader.) I like to compare a short poem to a paragraph: it has a main idea that may be stated or unstated, and everything in the poem points to or develops that one idea. (There are, of course, impressionistic poems that don’t follow that principle.)

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