SusieChairGreetings, Dear Friends!

Susie Larson here!

I post on the last Thursday of each month about the topic of building a speaking platform. Today I want to explore the idea of when it is okay to share about a personal heartache or trial, and when it is better to hold it for a while.

While I do believe that sometimes God calls us to step up and share a vulnerable story (while we are right in the midst of it all), most of the time wisdom calls us to give it time, to get on the other side of it, and to wipe the dirt off of the spoils from our war.

The thing is, certain types of pain produce amazing testimonies right in the midst of the pain, while other types of heartache require a time of healing and understanding.

For instance, I have heard of parents who have lost a child and who stood up and spoke about their loss with power and conviction only days after their tragedy. And, after hearing their testimony, many came to Christ. Absolutely amazing.

But when it comes to divorce, betrayal, or any kind of relational break down, those messages need time for healing, understanding, and even wisdom about what is best to share, and what is best to hold. Furthermore, when our stories involve other people, we need to be respectful of their story.

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Aloha from Karen,

Karen1208    This is a new year still-although the first month will end soon. God has given us
more  time. It’s up to us to use it wisely and make good choices for our writing    and marketing. For me, there will be a new book released next month (102 Wiggly Bible 97810000000009781426708497Rhymes and Rhythms) and that means I’m already doing some new marketing.

With the new year we can reflect on what has been changing and what new trends may be out there in marketing. I’d like to mention a few things I’ve noticed.

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Aloha from Karen, CAN TreasurerDSC_5017_3

So far this had been a crazy year for me with lots of writing (contracts) and lots of family activity. And then I cracked a rib sledding with one of my grandsons. In the midst of it all someone asked how I can keep up, be creative, and focus on writing with lots going on (plus pain).  I’ll chat about that today.

 

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Kern_web shot Jan here, writing on a drizzly but pleasant evening from northern California.

Did you know that yesterday was Hug-A-Writer Day in Canada? I’m wondering how many people knew about it—in Canada or anywhere else. I mean, did you get a hug yesterday? For being a writer?

As writers and speakers we enjoy those hugs once in a while, don’t you think? If not physical arms wrapping around our shoulders, at least someone in our corner who is willing to encourage us from time to time and say, “Hey, keep going! You can do it! You’re on the right track.”

But many days we keep going, pushing toward those deadlines and fulfilling speaking obligations, often without those background echoes of encouragement. We feel carried forward by our passion for our current WIP, our topic, or sometimes simply by the pleasure of stringing words together. It seems like enough.

Not for long.

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Author, Jeanette Hanscome

Hello from Jeanette. Today I spent 20 minutes in the backseat of our car with a trembling 50-lb dog. Car rides turn our pit mix, Belle, into a spineless mutt. They trigger memories of shots and other unpleasant vet visits. I assured Belle that we were only going to PetSmart to get her nails trimmed but she continued to squeal and pace, starring helplessly out the window, silently pleading to passersby, “Help me! I’m on my way to the manicurist. It’s so scary there.” I teased Belle about being a big baby, reminded her of her bread, but nothing worked. We dragged her into PetSmart, handed her over to the torturers  . . . I mean the guy with the clippers, and waited for the wails. Of course we heard none. Like a two-year-old who only cries long enough to make Mom feel guilty for leaving her in the church nursery, she was fine as soon as we walked away with our receipt. We returned in ten minutes to a relaxed dog. The clipping was over. And it wasn’t so bad. In fact, judging from the look on her face, it felt good to have those claws out of the way. All that whimpering for nothing.

So what does this have to do with writing, speaking, and book promotion? A lot, actually.

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