“What did she use this time?” The kind man who cleans my white carpets squats down to inspect the splashed rainbow.

“Acrylic and oils.” I show him the finished masterpiece displayed on the easel above the carpet’s danger zone.

He nods appreciatively, and from his arsenal of stain removers, sprays over the area what I assume to be an anti-acrylic and an oil neutralizing solution.

“You must see this kind of cleanup project a lot in your business.” I think of the dropped plate of spaghetti he cleaned last time he was here.

“Not like this.” He gives the fading spot a thorough scrub. “Backed up toilets, pet stains, and shoes that should have been left at the door.”

I nod because he has cleaned all those at my house, too. And I remember when my young daughter showed me her painting. Her face had been alight with the artistic freedom that comes when her hands have translated her heart to canvas. Just as much paint lay on the carpet below and as she followed my gaze, she was incredulous.

“Sorry, Mom, I didn’t see that.”

Of course not. Nor did she remember to use a drop cloth the three times before. Which is how I have gotten to know the carpet cleaning guy well enough that he took one of our kittens home to his family.

Home is the art studio for life. And like all art studios, they are creatively messy, reflecting developing people, talents, and relationships. There is a tension between keeping a tidy house and using the living areas for – well – living.

The mother of Orville and Wilbur Wright commonly directed family and guests to eat meals in the living room since the dining room table was spread with the brothers’ latest invention. Because Mrs. Wright designated space for her children to test ideas, Orville and Wilbur turned the possibility of flight into reality. That mother’s legacy outlives her for all of history because she gave wings to her sons long before they learned how to fly.       

Our Creator, God surrounds us with opportunity to create beauty. By extending to one another big and small acts of kindness, respect, and thoughtfulness on a consistent basis during good times and challenging days, people form relationship glue, those touch points that hold us together despite crisis and through celebrations. Those connections, poignant moments, and laughing-until-milk-comes-out-our-nose form a shared history and confirm that we belong. Together.

We are most like God when we create and forgive. When we paint with abundantly broad strokes of grace and love, we form relationship glue.

PeggySue Wells

PeggySue Wells

PeggySue Wells is the bestselling author of 29 books including Homeless for the Holidays, The Girl Who Wore Freedom, and Chasing Sunrise. Watch for her newest book, Ten Best Decisions A Single Mom Can Make with Pam Farrel, releasing in September. Connect with PeggySue at www.PeggySueWells.com.

 

 

 

 

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As I played with my two-year-old grandson in the backyard, a noise caught his attention, and he turned toward the street.

“Get back here,” I called. “You are naughty and going immediately into time out for the rest of your life. Now, think about what you’ve done, and how you will fix it!”

Are you scandalized by my response? Understandable.

But how often do we think God responds to our choices and messes in this angry fashion?  

Of course, I didn’t speak those soul-wounding words. I came alongside as he toddled in an unsafe direction. “Hey, buddy. Let’s go back where you’re safe.” He turned into my arms, I scooped him up, and in that instant, he was safe. I carried him to the protected yard where we laughed and played.

When my child explores beyond safe boundaries, makes unwise choices, and disobeys, I don’t demand she grovel, do penance, or humiliate herself to satisfy my displeasure. But I am overjoyed when she hears my voice and turns into my embrace. Then I carry her to safety.

Somehow, I believed asking God to forgive included groveling and muscling myself into alignment with God’s perfect will. I thought I had to prove authentic sorrow and sincere desire for forgiveness.

But forgiveness is something so free and inviting, I can’t wait to repent.

Like me, have you ever wandered, stomped off in anger, drifted away in heartbreak, and become lost from relationship with God? When I’ve made a mess of my choices, my life, my relationships, and with God, there is no way I can fix or polish my problems. I can’t find my way back on track to God.

Knowing I am incapable of securing salvation, God is near with arms open in invitation and welcome.

Like my grandson, who simply turned into my hug, I repent by turning into God’s embrace. In that instant, I am safe where I belong.

Homeless for the Holidays, by PeggySue Wells & Marsha Wright

Homeless for the Holidays, by PeggySue Wells & Marsha Wright

PeggySue Wells

PeggySue Wells

PeggySue Wells, history buff and island votary, is the best-selling author of 29 books including Chasing Sunrise and Homeless for the Holidays.

 

 

 

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What a wonderful God we have—he is the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, 

the source of every mercy, and the one who so wonderfully comforts 

and strengthens us in our hardships and trials.

2 Corinthians 1:3–4 (TLB)

People need hope more than advice. What a freedom to know that it is never necessary to have our life all in order before helping another. God does not expect us to be experts but He does call us to come alongside each other.

All human beings have two things in common. We all experience pain and we all need a Savior.

 A crisis can destroy someone or make that person stronger. How we face the crisis often depends on what kind of support we receive. Often the best comfort comes from one who has been there. Each of us has real life experience that could support another who is facing a crossroad.

We know from our own journey that comfort comes from large as well as seemingly small gestures. As we touch those who are in distress, we become a conduit connecting them with God’s unfailing love.

Life is a team sport. We have an enormous opportunity to be the hands of Jesus that reach out and bring hope and encouragement to a hurting world. As Ecclesiastes 4:10 says, “If one falls down, his friend can help him up. But pity the man who falls and has no one to help him up!”

 

Lord, as you say in 2 Corinthians 1:4, when others are troubled, needing my sympathy and encouragement, I can pass on to them this same help and comfort God has given me.

 

PeggySue Wells

PeggySue Wells

Chasing Sunrise

Chasing Sunrise

History buff and island votary PeggySue Wells is the best-selling author of twenty-nine books including Chasing Sunrise, and Homeless for the Holidays.

 

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PeggySue Wells
Marti Pieper

Marti Pieper

Greetings from Marti Pieper in a Florida fall, which, to non-Florida residents, looks a lot like summertime. Like many parts of the country, we’re having an unseasonably warm fall. Enterprising entrepreneurs may find a market for pumpkin spice suntan lotion (just kidding, but it wouldn’t surprise me to find this product on the shelf).

Our interviewee’s most recent book will at least have us thinking toward cooler weather because it’s a holiday story. A hearty CAN welcome to author PeggySue Wells!

PeggySue Wells

PeggySue Wells

PeggySue, please tell us about your book.

It’s Christmas, and Jack Baker’s finances, friends and future are as gone as last year’s holiday. Jack Baker had it all—family, career and a generous bonus to spend on the annual Baker Christmas extravaganza. Now, the Bakers are homeless. One family loses it all and finds they have everything. Read More →

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PeggySue Wells
Sarah Sundin

Sarah Sundin

Greetings from Sarah Sundin! What an honor to interview PeggySue Wells today. A popular speaker and radio host, this multi-published author of both nonfiction and fiction is brimming with humor and energy. I know you’ll enjoy her interview as much as I did.

PeggySue, how did you get into writing?

PeggySue Wells

PeggySue Wells

As a kid, my favorite aisle in the store was stationery – all those gorgeous pens and inviting paper with endless story possibilities. In college I was a modern dance major until I blew out both knees and the specialist said I would be lucky to walk. The other major in the college catalog that made my eyes light up was journalism and I took to it like a horse to sweet feed. In college I won the best feature award, best news story award, and my personal favorite, most misleading headline that year in the state of California.

Newly married, I was the head reporter for our small-town newspaper until I came home to raise and school my seven favorite children and do the occasional freelance project.

Armed with the caulk gun, one day I called my best friend and the only other person in town with a traveling husband. “Ants are coming in my second-story window, trailing across the bedroom, and disappearing somewhere in my bathroom. Someone should tell me how to be the wife of a frequently absent spouse.”

She laughed and we commiserated. About twenty minutes later she called back. “I think you should write that book and I would support you.”

Mary Ann Froehlich and I co-authored my first published title, Holding Down the Fort. Read More →

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