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Gail Gaymer MartinGood morning from Gail Gaymer Martin www.gailmartin.com

The world of publishing has changed rapidly in the past two years–even the past year. Digital has opened doors for authors out-of-print novels and for unpublished writers to make their books available as ebooks.  But one thing we know about all books is if they are not well written, if they do not hook the reader and hold them captive, the reader will not return for another try with this author.

Authors who have not honed their craft and who've written a novel that only their friends and family love have not truly tested the water.  Readers are a critical bunch–me included–who tear books apart that do not know what makes a great read. Many readers let the authors know their failures through letters and email, and spread the word when a bad book is out there.



But the good news is if you've honed your craft, if you've plotted a novel that grabs the reader from page one and carries it through, and if you've created believable character in which they can relate, readers will spread the word. This is how most books hit the NY Times Best Selling books — that and an established novelist with a huge fan base. But those authors are few and far between.

So what should newer writers do? How can they hone their craft and get their books in print while competing with thousands of people who think they've written the next best seller? Finding an agent willing to work with you is one answer, but you can also look at the alternates.

So often articles are prejudiced by the writers, providing you with information that only supports their view point. I read a Tweet today from the MacGregor Literary Agency that I was pleased to see offered much fodder for both sides of the agent and non-agent coin. The answer is multifaceted but I think you will benefit from reading the blog on this topic.

In my blog Writing Fiction Right www.writingright-martin.blogspot.com, I've provided numerous articles on self-publishing pros and cons, and even publishing pros and cons when you are contracted with a small house with big promises they can't fulfill.  Be a smart writer. Look at the options. Check Editors and Preditors site for information that can help you, and you can also read this article which offers an unprejudice point of view on getting published.
http://chipmacgregor.typepad.com/main/2012/02/does-a-beginning-writer-need-an-agent-.html

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