CrystalBowman300-225x300Hello from Crystal Bowman! This blog post is for those who want to write fiction for children, and even for those who don’t because the more you know, the more you grow. Most of my books are for the children’s devotional or Bible storybook market. However, I have written several fiction picture books as well as few dozen I Can Read! books, so I want to share something I learned many years ago in my novice years of writing. The mistake many writers make (and I used to be one of them) is to write an explanatory introduction to “set up” the story.  Read More →

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube

Jeanette Levellie headshot“Nutty with a Dash of Meat” Jeanette Levellie here with a fun–but not at the time–story about how the Lord gave me a kick in the pants to help me learn humility. I hope you don’t need this lesson, but just in case . . .

Playing the Comparison Game

When our family performed a special music program on a Sunday night, the people in the congregation were effusive in their compliments. As I prayed after the concert, I found myself playing the comparison game.

“Why can’t our people be like these, Lord? Why did you call us to pastor a church full of nit-picky grumps? I’m tired of forgiving, loving, and blessing such ungrateful babies.”

Deep in my heart, His fatherly voice poked my conscience.  “You think you’re better than they are.” Read More →

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube

BobHostetlerBob Hostetler here, offering another prayer for writers:

Lord God Almighty, I confess that I have sinned against you through my own fault, in thought and word and deed, by what I have done and by what I have left undone.

I confess that I have too often trusted my own strength instead of relying on yours;
I have let my puny ability suffice when I could have and should have laid hold of your ready power.

I confess that I have chased after mammon, and written for mere money,
instead of seeking first your kingdom and your glory, and writing to please you.

I confess that I have been jealous of other writers and their success,
and have been ungrateful for all the kindness you have shown me.

I confess that I have taken shortcuts in my writing
and have been lazy in the hard work of planning and researching,
of editing and rewriting,
of reviewing and proofreading.

I confess that I have neglected prayer,
as if my activity is more important than yours in my writing.

I confess that I have chosen leisure over discipline,
speed over craft,
and my voice instead of your voice.

Thank you for the assurance of your forgiveness through my Lord, Jesus Christ.
_________________

Bob’s latest book is The Bard and the Bible, available now via Bob’s website or at fine Christian retailers everywhere.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube

CrystalBowman300-225x300Hello from Crystal Bowman. I am happy to tell you that I am spending the summer in Michigan rather than my home in Florida. I have three grandhildren in Michigan, so besides the beautiful weather, those are three great reasons to be here! I have been writing for children for over 25 years and also have an editing service for children’s writers who are trying to get their books published. When I review proposals, I often see a good proposal with the manuscript tacked on at the end. What I often don’t see is a paginated manuscript. Read More →

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube

walking shoes

by Judith Couchman

Writing is one way of making the world our own, and . . . walking is another.

—Geoff Nicholson

Long before doctors claimed physical movement as heart healthy, walking and writing joined hands. Writers have traipsed miles to stretch their legs, clear their brains, and feed their creativity. Walking enhanced their ability to form ideas and solve dilemmas.

The poets William Blake and Henry Wadsworth walked to explore their imaginations. Charles Henry Miller explained, “Most writing is done away from the typewriter, away from the desk. I’d say it occurs in the quiet, silent moments, while you’re walking.” Charles Dickens claimed, “The sum of the whole is this: walk and be happy; walk and be healthy.”

More recently, the prolific author Julia Cameron heartily recommends walking for informing her work. She walks to listen to her soul. “All large change is made through many small steps. Notice that word in there: ‘steps.’ Walking leads us a step at a time. Walking gives us a gentle path,” she says. “We are talked to as we walk. We hear guidance. It comes from within us and from the world around us.”

If you’re tired but need to write, pause to walk. It will revive you, body and soul.

Judith Couchman is an author, speaker, writing coach, and adjunct professor. She’s traditionally published more than 42 works. Learn more about her at www.judithcouchman.com. Write to her at judith@judithcouchman.com.

Judith Couchman

Save

Save

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutubeFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinrssyoutube